New Jersey Emerging Conservation Professionals

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Hiking in the Pine Barrens. Photo by Felysse Goldman.

Interested in pursuing a career in New Jersey’s environmental field? Want to learn more about what types of jobs are out there? Or do you want to go hiking with a group of recent grads who love the outdoors and craft beer? Check out New Jersey Emerging Conservation Professionals on Facebook!

Back in March of 2015, a group of “emerging professionals” got together during a forum at an environmental conference. Everyone enjoyed their time at the event and wanted to continue hanging out and talking about career goals, challenges that young professionals face, great birding locations in the Garden State, etc. Soon, our Facebook group was formed.

We post community events, create our own  like Birds and Beers, we visit a birding spot and hit a local brewery afterwards and we recently started organizing weekend retreats. In early April 2016, a group of us spent the weekend kayaking down the Batsto River in the Pine Barrens with Pinelands Adventures and hiking in Franklin Parker Preserve.

New Jersey Emerging Conservation Professionals also participate in volunteer events, like helping out at amphibian crossing nights with the Friends of East Brunswick Environmental Commission.

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Spotted Salamander in East Brunswick, New Jersey

Check us out on Facebook and join us at our next event!

Salamander Crossing: Road Closed

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Yellow Spotted Salamander © Lindsay McNamara

Yellow Spotted Salamander © Lindsay McNamara

On the night of March 14, 2015, I attended the first closure of Beekman Road this season. Beekman Road, in East Brunswick, New Jersey, is closed to traffic about two or three nights for six to twelve hours each spring by Friends of the East Brunswick Environmental Commission (Friends of EBEC). Friends of EBEC organizes these road closures to maintain local biodiversity.

In the woods on either side of Beekman Road, vernal pool habitat exists. Vernal pools are temporary woodland ponds that fill with water during the winter and spring and dry out in the summer. These vernal pools are extremely important for a number of amphibians in the area. Spotted salamanders, wood frogs, green frogs, spring peepers, Fowlers toads and chorus frogs all rely on the vernal pools for breeding.

Read the full post on the Conserve Wildlife blog.